International Women’s Day – some of our women members share tips and advice for Women in Field Engineering

Today is March 8th, 2023, and is International Women’s Day.
The number of women working in engineering is continuing to rise across all sectors, industries, and regions. Change is happening faster in some places than others, but each year sees progress.
Some of our members share their advice.

Millicent Alooh

Millicent Alooh from Kenya has experience as an Engineer, as a Manager of Biomedical Engineers. She is now Regional Director at the Rice360 Institute for Global Health Technologies in Houston Texas.

Millicent Alooh

Millicent gives this advice.
The advice for all women Engineers is to maximize their potential in this male dominated career by always updating themselves with the new technology. For us to break the glass ceiling we need to strive for excellence, and this can only be achieved through constant learning, sharing knowledge, and supporting one another.
Hold a woman Engineer’s hand today and create the change that we need in this profession.

Rhiannon Thurmond

Rhiannon Thurmond has been in the Biomedical industry in the United States for over 16 years. She now covers South Texas as a Field Service Engineer for Associated Imaging Services.

Rhiannon Thurmond

Rhiannon gives this advice.
Set yourself up for success with all the needed tools and resources organized so that you can work efficiently. Organized notes, manuals and tool bag can simplify your life and mind when working in the field. Using cloud-based software like Google drive/Dropbox, cloud storage makes it easier to file share needed software, manuals and schematics, and tech notes for offline viewing. Always plan ahead, reviewing past work trends on devices you are servicing, checking manuals before scheduling repairs, and ensuring you have all needed tools/parts on hand before scheduling. Being prepared will make all the difference when you are in the field.

Denise Williams

Denise Williams has an extensive background in Field Services, Operations, Sales, and Distribution, and most recently ten years working in Global Field Services Operations for Schneider Electric.
She is now working as leader of RDS with the target of providing the best possible digital tools for Field Engineers.

Denise Williams

Denise gives this advice.
Ladies, the door is open, enter, and do good things. If you love tinkering with hand tools, if you love data and numbers, if you are curious about cell structures, then do it or at least try. Self-discovery and self-awareness are very powerful. You define your path and find your supporters. Also, go for promotions and leadership positions, we need you.

Rachael Crentsil

Rachael grew up in Ghana and studied at the Regional Maritime University. She is now a Marine Engineering Trainee for the Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority.

Rachael Crentsil

Rachael gives this advice.
My simple advice: I want to tell females out there to always attempt the impossible and whenever you have knowledge, allow others to light their candle in it. Spread love and positivity wherever you find yourself.

Begüm Demirtaş

Begüm Demirtaş grew up in Turkey and then studied in Sweden. She completed her degree in Wind Power Project Management and then joined Vestas as a Wind Turbine Technician.

Begüm Demirtaş

Begüm gives this advice.
Success doesn’t have gender, never give up on your dreams!

Lina A. Asante

Lina Asante is a Biomedical Engineer from Ghana who was most recently Senior Clinical Engineering manager at the University for Ghana Medical Centre. She is currently the Dr Lee Jong-wook fellow and studying in South Korea.

Lina A. Asante

Lina gives this advice.
Despite the progress made in recent years, women are still underrepresented in science and engineering, and it can be easy to feel like you don’t belong or that you’re not good enough. But the truth is that you have just as much potential as anyone else, and you deserve to be there. So, do not let imposter syndrome or the biases of others hold you back. Be confident in your skills and knowledge and be proud of the unique perspective you bring to the table as a woman in engineering or science. Seek out mentors and allies who share your interests and values, and I could bet that with prayer, determination, hard work, and a positive attitude, you can achieve great things and make a significant impact in the field.

Tamsin Minton

Tamsin Minton has worked as a Support Engineer and is now a Service Delivery Manager for NetApp. She also leads the NetApp WIT (Women in Tech) UK group.

Tamsin Minton

Tamsin gives this advice.
My one piece of advice to women thinking of entering the industry would be to believe in yourself more. Too many women self-sabotage their capabilities by a lack of self-belief. Take chances, say yes to more opportunities and practise believing that you can achieve things outside of your current skill set. Growth happens outside of the comfort zone and when something scares you, you should probably do it anyway!

Robin Deal

Robin Deal has many years of experience in making wastewater safe and now works for Hubbard-Hall as a Wastewater Treatment Specialist and Product Manager. She is also the Vice Chair of the local American Water Works Association.

Robin Deal

Robin gives this advice.
People will tell you that you don’t have a place in STEM. They are wrong. Everyone has a place where they shine. If you love science, technology, maths, engineering, or any combination of these, don’t let someone else dictate how you pursue your passions. Follow your dreams and don’t stop just because someone says red light.

Elsie Kafui Ayi

Elsie Kafui Ayi is a Field Service Engineer who works on healthcare equipment and devices. She is also involved in training. At the moment, Elsie works for ISN Medical and is based in Ghana.

Elsie Kafui Ayi

Elise gives this advice.
You don’t want to be tossed about by every seemingly great opportunity. So, you have to draw a career plan as early as possible and be guided by this plan. Carefully think about where you would want to be or what you would want to have achieved in a year, five years or ten years and align your immediate goals to your short- or long-term career plan. It’s okay to make amendments in line with your interests and strengths but don’t lose focus.
Be your greatest fan. Encourage and never underestimate yourself. You have come this far because you are smart and able for every task. Keep learning, work smart and work hard.

Rocio Anillo

Rocio Anillo studied Biomedical Engineering at the University of Seville. She now works as a Field Service Engineer at GE Healthcare in Barcelona, Spain. Rocio continued her education whilst working and has an MBA from UNIDEMA.

Rocio Anillo

Rocio gives this advice.
My piece of advice is to be self-confident and empowered and make your work every day a challenge. Don’t be afraid of participating in discussions and asking in order to improve your knowledge. I think all this is possible in a company which is inclusive and has an equality mindset.

Further reading

Women engineers share their experience and advice.

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  1. Happy International Women’s Day to all the women out there.

    Caroline you are supposed to have your picture posted there.

    You are all special and amazing.

  2. Happy International Women’s Day to us all women.

    We are capable of doing whatever we put our minds to. Let us keep striving for excellence in this field we find ourselves. We can and will make an impact!